Main Menu

Blood plasma from 3 people in Singapore used in Trump’s Covid-19 treatment


Tables at the $440-per-head restaurant in a…
BTS’ ‘insensitivity’ irks China fans
The best ways to celebrate Halloween
This Bakery Is Selling Cakes Specific…
America’s first female captain of a mega
Singapore Faces Deep ‘Scarring’ From Virus…
Black man led by rope by white cops on…
US joins six countries in new call for backdoor…
Elon Musk Says Autopilot Self-Driving…
From Taylor Swift to Joe Biden, the power…
This sweet potato casserole is perfect…
Flying between New York and London with…
Adobe puts artificial intelligence tools into…
Czech government closing bars, shiftin…
2021 Mercedes-AMG E63 S Does It All
Mothers suffering increasing anxiety…
Pink Pineapples Are Officially Available for…
The traditional British pub is transforming …
Samsung’s Galaxy Note 10 is down to $550 at…
Most Singaporeans feel neutral or positive…
Anne-Marie replaces pregnant Meghan
Misbehaviour movie review: Keira Knig…
Hong Kong scientists say anti-microbe drug…
Costco Is Selling Maple and Pecan Lava Cakes…
Walk back in time: four historic hikes in…
Slovakia’s far-right leader sentenced to 4…
Catch up on all the iPhone 12 rumors…
2021 Hyundai Santa Fe’s New Powertrains…
I Asked A Behavioural Scientist to Help My…
Tables at the $440-per-head restaurant in a grounded Singapore Airlines aircraft…
Singapore — The experimental antibody treatment used by the doctors of United States President Donald Trump included plasma samples from the blood of three recovered Covid-19 patients in Singapore.
And while Mr Trump was discharged from hospital on Monday (Oct 5), a mere three days after it was reported that he had tested positive for Covid-19, it is by no means guaranteed that his battle with the disease is over.
The US President, as one of the most powerful leaders in the world, had access to the best possible treatments and medications for Covid-19, including an experimental antibody treatment that has shown success but has not yet received emergency use authorisation from the US Food and Drug Administration.
The experimental treatment came from biotech firm Regeneron, which said that it had received a “compassionate use” request from Mr Trump’s doctors.
On Monday (Oct 5), Asian Scientist Magazine reported that one of the two antibodies in Regeneron’s treatment, REGN-COV2, given to the US President had been developed using blood samples from three patients in Singapore.
Studies have shown that plasma from patients who recovered from the infection could be used to treat or even prevent the disease. However, using this treatment on a large scale has been impossible because of the challenges in obtaining sufficient blood from volunteers.
What Regeneron has done is to clone Sars-CoV-2 binding antibodies from recovered patients as well as ones from “humanised” mice in order to “produce a reliable source of monoclonal antibodies”.
The US President was given the antibody treatment before his admission to the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last Friday (Oct 2). While he was at Walter Reed, the antiviral drug, Remdesivir, was given to him in multiple doses, along with dexamethasone, a steroid used in treating inflammation in patients with grave cases of Covid-19.
On Monday (Oct 5), Mr Trump showed that he was in good spirits, tweeting: “I feel better than I did 20 years ago!”
He told the American public upon his return to the White House: “Don’t be afraid of it. You’re going to beat it.”
Meanwhile, critics have pointed out that ordinary Americans do not have the access to the treatment available to the President. According to a Professor of Medicine at George Washington University, Dr Jonathan Renier: “The President might be the only patient on the planet ever to receive this particular combination of medicines.”
However, Harvard public health expert Dr Jeremy Faust told Agence France-Presse: “People will see this and they’ll think that this is the treatment you should have — and if you don’t give it to other people who have coronavirus that we’re denying them special treatment. In reality that’s not the case.” /TISG
You Will Regret Not Buying This Smart Backpack!
diagnostic code reader






Comments are Closed